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UNPACKING A PROVOCATION

HOW FILMING OUR PROVOCATION HELPED DEVELOP OUR LITERACY AND UOI LESSONS

INTRODUCTION

This is an extended explanation of how film and photo techniques can provide useful catalysts to aid reflection and inquiry in the classroom. For reference the central idea of our Unit of Inquiry based on the Who We Are transdisciplinary theme was:

Reflecting on our attitudes and mindset allows us to respond to challenges with confidence.

INITIAL REFLECTION

The provocation had been a challenging hike for the third graders. Upon returning from the hike the first thing we did (after eating lunch, resting and generally take a bit of time out) was to reflect as a whole class. Pictured below are the student’s reflections. They described their feelings, the what they though the purpose of the hike was and tapped into what they felt they now understood of the transdisciplinary theme.

After this, I quickly clipped all the video files into one film, and uploaded it to the team Drive for all teachers to share with their classes as an exit-ticket activity for the day. I further uploaded it to SeeSaw.

SEESAW & REFLECTION

The next day students were told to use a pair of headphones and their iPad and map out the hike, noting how they felt, where they felt challenged and what strategies they felt they had identified that helped them overcome their challenges. By uploading the film to SeeSaw, students were able to isolate themselves and focus on what they felt as they viewed the film and remembered how they had felt while on the hike, as opposed to doing this only as a whole class as was done the day before. This is just one example where  effective documentation of learning activities is able to aid reflective practices and promote independent inquiry.

OUR LITERACY FOCUS: SMALL MOMENTS

Small moments was the chosen literacy focus for the second Unit of Inquiry. The central teaching point was that students were to select one moment from the hike, and then extend it. This was another example where the film of the hike helped students remember what it felt like as they were doing the hike, and when students viewed the maps they had created as part of the SeeSaw activity and reflection, they were better positioned to attempt this activity. Different moments of the hike were already clearly demarcated by different locations, activities and feelings. This aided our literacy work immensely.

CONCLUSION

To conclude, documenting learning and classroom activity in a way that does not infringe upon students happiness, and importantly their privacy, is a highly effective tool that can and should be used by educators in the classroom.

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